Back on the wagon

Why is it that when we need time to recuperate and be a little less productive for a while, some of us beat ourselves up for not reaching our “usual” standards? And why is it that “usual” standards are often the level we manage when we are at our peak? Shouldn’t it be some kind of middle ground instead?


Sometimes we need to do nothing. To know that yes, in a few days we’ll have to do well at something or other, but that’s way over there in the future. For now, we can rest.


Bujoing has helped me see the things I actually do instead of the things I don’t do. Maybe it can do this for others as well. Instead of constantly focusing on the future and what we haven’t done, we can go back over the pages and see the things we dreaded last week, the giant hurdle we braved last month, and feel satisfied that we pushed through.


And while on the subject of bullet journalling, why beat yourself up over the gaping holes in your habit tracker? So you needed a few days off. Who doesn’t? Be sensible: you’re not going to clean the house every day for the rest of your life, no matter how much you believe it while you’re drawing up your habit tracker.


By all means reach for the stars and reach the treetops, but don’t reach so hard that you dislocate your shoulder. It’s fine to fall off the wagon. The wagon will be there when you want back on, and guess what? You have the perfect getting-back-on list in your habit tracker. A few tasks in and you’ll feel like you were never off track!


Be kind to yourself. You never know when you’ll pay it back. 😉



Why get up at 5.30am even though you’re working from home and can sleep until 7am?

Because you can freeze to death at a brightening twilight beach.



Because you gradually realize that the dots out there aren’t clumps of grass, but geese.



Because of honking swans in the thin veils of mist.



Because the sky turns pink.




Morning mist and memories

The view from my train station can be truly stunning when the weather’s right. And this is just an iPhone pic without filters! (Yep, I regret not bringing my new camera…)

It was on a morning like this (slightly misty, with a cold sun just barely breaking through) that I walk-dictated Xavier’s initial Guy-confusion in All You Can Eat, and that waterside path will always make me think of those scenes.

It’s funny how the brain works. There’s a park in Gothenburg that will always make me think of the Beatles, because I used to listen to them while I walked to university early in the morning, and our downstairs kitchen will always hum Ghost because I listened to them while I painted it.

Some things are branded on our memories because our brains deemed them miraculous or life-saving enough to store forever – and apparently, for me, the hazy horizon of this harbour is one of those things.