Back on the wagon

Why is it that when we need time to recuperate and be a little less productive for a while, some of us beat ourselves up for not reaching our “usual” standards? And why is it that “usual” standards are often the level we manage when we are at our peak? Shouldn’t it be some kind of middle ground instead?


Sometimes we need to do nothing. To know that yes, in a few days we’ll have to do well at something or other, but that’s way over there in the future. For now, we can rest.


Bujoing has helped me see the things I actually do instead of the things I don’t do. Maybe it can do this for others as well. Instead of constantly focusing on the future and what we haven’t done, we can go back over the pages and see the things we dreaded last week, the giant hurdle we braved last month, and feel satisfied that we pushed through.


And while on the subject of bullet journalling, why beat yourself up over the gaping holes in your habit tracker? So you needed a few days off. Who doesn’t? Be sensible: you’re not going to clean the house every day for the rest of your life, no matter how much you believe it while you’re drawing up your habit tracker.


By all means reach for the stars and reach the treetops, but don’t reach so hard that you dislocate your shoulder. It’s fine to fall off the wagon. The wagon will be there when you want back on, and guess what? You have the perfect getting-back-on list in your habit tracker. A few tasks in and you’ll feel like you were never off track!


Be kind to yourself. You never know when you’ll pay it back. 😉



Why get up at 5.30am even though you’re working from home and can sleep until 7am?

Because you can freeze to death at a brightening twilight beach.



Because you gradually realize that the dots out there aren’t clumps of grass, but geese.



Because of honking swans in the thin veils of mist.



Because the sky turns pink.




Morning fog

I got up early again, because I missed yesterday’s spectacular dawn with gravlax pink and gold shining through the bus window. But when I reached the hill where I’d planned to snap my pictures, I was just too foggy. Made for some atmospheric shots of the woods, though.


These are some interesting geese. They’ve been following the swans around the pond for weeks now. As soon as the swans move, so do the geese!


The sun finally rose over the misty hills. Here seen peeking at a sleeping lorry.



Future uncertain but bright



This morning was misty but bright, and I was nervous because I was headed for yet another disappointing first-meeting-with-the-medical-profession.

But soft – what light through yonder window breaks?


This woman was a miracle worker, and an oracle to boot. She told me exactly everything that was wrong with my back (not a short list after 40 years on this Earth), and as she talked, I realized that I’d heard something similar – from my school nurse, when I was thirteen.

Of course, when that nurse discovered my problems, she immediately began treatment or at least referred me to someone who could do it.

Hahaha. Now, that would require the system to work, wouldn’t it?

She just said I was crooked and then let me go.

And so, almost thirty years later, I have prickles in my arms and hands, inflammations in my neck and shoulders, two steel bars running down my back to hold me up, and aches and pains in my hips and lower back.

Enter the miracle worker again. She kneaded and pulled and jostled me this way and that, and then gave me specific exercices to do until next time. “But wait,” I said as the clock raced towards the end of the appointment, “There’s this stretching exercice I was told to do and it hurts like hell and afterwards I feel all wobbly and weird,” and I got down on my knees and showed her…

And there was almost no pain at all.


I don’t often say ‘Halleluiah’, but today might just merit that kind of hyperbole. Fingers super crossed that this will actually work!